Back The Guardian ‘I felt a sickening pain’: how the ‘first true Hitchcock movie’ almost killed its star
Search Sections 17 Jan
Close
Advertisement
12 Jan 8:00am

‘I felt a sickening pain’: how the ‘first true Hitchcock movie’ almost killed its star

The Guardian
Alfred Hitchcock described his third film, The Lodger, as the true beginning of his directorial career but it would prove a near fatal screen debut for its leading light June Tripp December 1925 was a busy month for June. A fixture of the West End stage since childhood, her surname, Tripp, had been excised by the impresario Charles B Cochran because it “sounds a bit comical for a dancer”. She spent the days rehearsing for a musical, Kid Boots, the evenings starring in another, Mercenary Mary, and then would “rush to the studio at midnight”, to act in a horse-racing short film opposite the fading American film star Carlyle Blackwell. The studio was at Poole Street, Islington, in north London, built five years earlier by Paramount but now rented out, most often to a British company, Gainsborough, run by Michael Balcon. The short, Riding for a King, starred the celebrated jockey
Read full story
 Like Comment
Advertisement

Comments

No comments yet...
On the top

Date settings

Today is Monday, January 17, 2022

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept

The Guardian

Close