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Friday, December 3, 2021
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3 Dec 2021, 10:49am The Treaty shows history in the making – and proves the power of political theatre
The Guardian
Colin Murphy’s remarkable play takes us behind closed doors as high-stakes negotiations for Irish independence take place ‘I wanna be in the room where it happens,” sings Aaron Burr in Hamilton. Since most of us have the desire to know what goes on behind closed doors, there is a riveting fascination to Colin Murphy’s play The Treaty, about the
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3 Dec 2021, 10:39am The Wife to Touching the Void: the seven best films to watch on TV
The Guardian
Glenn Close is mesmerising as a betrayed and undermined spouse, while Joe Simpson recounts his tale of extreme survival in the Peruvian Andes When Glenn Close was nominated a seventh time for an Oscar for this
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3 Dec 2021, 9:47am Captains of Zaatari review – football-mad Syrian refugee kids yearn for escape
The Guardian
Ali El Arabi keeps his teenage subjects up close in this wonderfully empathetic film that humanises displaced people The opening of Ali El Arabi’s documentary is achingly evocative in its quotidian simplicity. Under the last light of the day, a football is kicked into the air. As the camera follows the spinning ball, the comforting ordinariness is ruptured by the sight of barbed wires and housing barracks. Here is a slice of life in
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3 Dec 2021, 8:16am Antony Sher: a consummate Shakespearean and a man of staggering versatility
The Guardian
One of the most gifted actors of his era, Sher –
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3 Dec 2021, 7:00am The best food books of 2021
The Guardian
From Stanley Tucci’s Italian feasts and Yotam Ottolenghi’s sweet-and-sour plums, to Anja Dunk’s wonderful German bakes – this year’s most mouth-watering titles My favourite cookbooks look like DayGlo hedgehogs – bristling with Post-it notes next to all the recipes I want to try. One of the most neon-edged books in the house is Ruby Tandoh’s new
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3 Dec 2021, 7:00am ‘Evolution is part of tradition’: musician Makaya McCraven on the future of jazz
The Guardian
Fusing bebop with hip-hop sampling, the Chicago-based drummer is finding new ways on his Blue Note debut to expand the boundaries of jazz Each day we have so many choices to make and we are constantly improvising them, just like playing jazz,” says the drummer-composer Makaya McCraven. “Even when we try to organise and sanitise the world so that we can function – that’s us improvising in different frameworks. It’s all an expression of life.” Wearing a black T-shirt emblazoned with the slogan “Listen more” – as if signposting to his interviewer – the 38-year-old McCraven is fizzing with energy while speaking from his basement home studio in Chicago. As he philosophically explores his unique style of composition – improvising while playing live and then chopping up the subsequent recordings to create a patchwork of samples – his wife calls out from upstairs that she’s got his lunch.
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3 Dec 2021, 7:00am The girls are back in town! Why the Sex and the City sequel is about to eclipse the original
The Guardian
Grab your Manolos! Carrie and the gang are finally returning in And Just Like That. But, with a more diverse cast and writers’ room, could this reboot be even more radical?
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3 Dec 2021, 6:30am The Home Alone house is on Airbnb. Sounds like a trap | Stuart Heritage
The Guardian
Just how lucky will the guests who get to stay at the McCallister house later this month be? I foresee trouble In the interests of public service, I need to make you aware of a trap. Yesterday, a property became available on Airbnb. It is a large home in the Chicago area, available for one night only and it is suspiciously cheap. Look,
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3 Dec 2021, 6:00am Paolo Sorrentino: ‘Let’s say that almost everything is true’
The Guardian
In his new, semi-autobiographical film The Hand of God, the Italian auteur reflects on a tragedy that still haunts him In his 20-year career Paolo Sorrentino has orchestrated scenes of indelible virtuosity and grandeur: the pageantry of the
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3 Dec 2021, 5:00am How my lockdown obsession with Super Smash Bros led me to an esports epiphany
The Guardian
I didn’t expect to be making my competitive gaming debut at 30 – but over lockdown, my flatmates and I became hooked on Nintendo’s beloved brawler Thirty is definitely not the best age to kick off an esports career. In that world I am aged, with lower-back pain and reflexes about as sharp as a wooden spoon. But nonetheless, earlier this year, I found myself standing in a dimly lit east-London bar, huddled among the city’s greatest players of Super Smash Bros, Nintendo’s beloved fighting game. As the throng of competitors reminisced over previous tournaments and shared high-level techniques, I stared apprehensively at my name on the tournament ladder, hoping that nobody would find out that I only started playing Smash last year. At the risk of sounding like the narrator of a 90s teen film, let’s rewind. My Smash obsession began during the joyous era of lockdown one. As Covid-19 exploded devastatingly and invisibly, the humble Bow flat I shared slowly morphed from fun-loving party pad into cramped, claustrophobic prison. We did our best to keep things light with bike rides, poorly measured portions of weed brownies and increasingly ridiculous themed nights – but Super Smash Bros Ultimate was what really
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3 Dec 2021, 5:00am ‘A post-menopausal Macbeth’: Joel Coen on tackling Shakespeare with Frances McDormand
The Guardian
The writer-director talks about his new film, co-starring Denzel Washington, and reveals how it felt to work without his brother, Ethan, for the first time in nearly 40 years It might be the unlucky play for British theatre rep types. But for movie directors, Macbeth has been a talisman, a fascinating and liberating challenge – for Akira Kurosawa, with
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3 Dec 2021, 4:00am ‘I didn’t think this would air on the BBC’: the stars of shocking legal drama You Don’t Know Me
The Guardian
Samuel Adewunmi, Bukky Bakray and writer Tom Edge discuss highlighting startling racial prejudice in the justice system – and showing that it isn’t fit for purpose When he first read the script for You Don’t Know Me, Samuel Adewunmi assumed that the TV drama was set in the US. “It didn’t strike me as something that would air during primetime on the BBC,” he says. “It had so many Black characters at the forefront.” Once he clarified that the show was set in London (albeit filmed in Birmingham) it was “a must-have role. The whole story just felt truthful. I thought, this is a really interesting guy – his dignity, his identity, his morality – and the story was told from his perspective.” The four-part series opens with Adewunmi’s character, identified only as Hero, in the dock. On trial for murder, the hitherto law-abiding car salesman looks out at the jury and – in a desperate plea for their sympathy and mercy – begins to tell his story. In relaying his version of events to the court, he hopes to overcome what facts and evidence, both circumstantial and forensic, have suggested – and to avoid a life sentence.
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3 Dec 2021, 3:00am 40 years of Japanese rockers Shonen Knife: ‘Nirvana looked wild – I was so scared!’
The Guardian
With songs about jellybeans and feline transformations, the Osaka band brought joy and fun to a serious punk-rock scene. After decades of cult hits, frontwoman Naoko Yamano explains why she wants to end up the world’s oldest rock star Very few rock bands make it to 40 years. And for Shonen Knife, this landmark seems all the more unlikely – there haven’t been many all-women rock bands from Japan who turned their obsession with junk food, cute animals and Ramones into an international career. Their breakthrough came with 1992’s Let’s Knife, released in Britain by Creation Records shortly after a career-changing tour with Nirvana. It was a punk album like no other, featuring lyrical observations on the envy frontwoman Naoko Yamano felt for exotic American girls with blond hair and blue eyes, alongside pontification on life’s more frivolous joys: eating jellybeans, riding a bicycle, fishing for black bass, and – rather less relatably – becoming a cat and growing whiskers.
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3 Dec 2021, 3:00am Ed Sheeran & Elton John: Merry Christmas review – an overstuffed, undercooked turkey
The Guardian
Laudably released for charity, the favourite for this year’s Christmas No 1 leaves no musical cliche untwinkled – and its exhortation to forget the pandemic is crass Given recent government advice to avoid kissing strangers under the mistletoe this Christmas, there’s a sense in which the long-trailed festive hook-up between
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3 Dec 2021, 2:23am Doors guitarist Robbie Krieger: ‘The music will outlast the crazy Jim stuff’
The Guardian
In the musician’s new memoir, he aims to tell the true, uncensored story of one of the greatest bands of all time while dispelling some long-running myths This year marks half a century since the storied singer of the Doors, Jim Morrison, met his untimely death. Or at least that’s what most reasonable people believe happened. Due to a combination of denial, wishful thinking and some eagerly promoted conspiracy theories, however, some people actually believe that Morrison still lives. According to the Doors’ guitarist, Robbie Krieger, that’s just one of many outrageous myths, misconceptions or outright lies that have clung to the band’s story. “To me, what happened to the Doors was pretty damn cool just the way it was,” Krieger told the Guardian from his home in Los Angeles. “This wasn’t a story that needed to be hyped.” In order to represent his version of setting the record straight, then, Krieger has just published a memoir, Set the Night on Fire: Living, Dying and Playing Guitar with the Doors. It’s a doorstop-thick attempt to retell an oft-told tale, this time informed by a desire to suck the hot air out of the more inflated earlier versions, aided by a hilariously flip tone that makes this late-arriving history perhaps the most reliable, and certainly the most entertaining, of all. The witty prose, fashioned by co-author Jeff Alulis, stands in marked contrast to the bitter tone of the two
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3 Dec 2021, 1:02am The 50 best albums of 2021: 50-11
The Guardian
Getting closer! Our albums pics from 20-11 include Jazmine Sullivan on the reality of sex for women, Sam Fender’s grim yet epic air-punches and Tirzah bringing the universal to the tiny
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3 Dec 2021, 1:01am The 50 best films of 2021 in the UK: 50-11
The Guardian
Blockbusting Bond, a slow-trundling alt-western and a genre-bending Mexican movie are revealed as our critics’ countdown continues
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3 Dec 2021, 1:00am TV tonight: Chucky the killer doll returns for more Child’s Play
The Guardian
No one asked for this reboot, but that doesn’t stop it being fun. Plus: Clive Myrie swaps the Mastermind chair for Have I Got News For You. Here’s what to watch this evening
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