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Tuesday, January 12, 2021
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12 Jan 11:00am The Doorman review – Ruby Rose turns model action hero
The Guardian
When a heist goes wrong, an ex-soldier must mop up the mess – while Jean Reno plays a menacing Frenchman Model-turned-actor Ruby Rose (Orange Is the New Black, John Wick: Chapter 2), is utterly mesmerising to look at – with her lush lips, perfectly shaped eyebrows and macho tattoos – but so far the jury is very much out on whether she can act more than merely adequately. This action vehicle doesn’t exactly strengthen the case for her defence, although she moves with impressive grace in the actiony bits when required in closeups that show her character, Ali, whupping bad guys’ asses. Rose is meant to be a former marine, haunted by a botched assignmentthat cost the lives of a family she was protecting. In the film’s present tense, she takes a job as a doorman – shouldn’t it be “lobby attendant” or even “doorperson”? – at a posh New York City building, only to wander accidentally into a heist that goes very wrong.
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12 Jan 10:16am Rebekah: the techno DJ fighting sexual abuse in dance music
The Guardian
As #MeToo stories start to emerge in the dance scene, UK star Rebekah tells her own as she presses for industry change with her #ForTheMusic campaign DJ Rebekah remembers the day she walked into a record shop in her native Birmingham to ask for a job. Her parents had bought her a set of turntables just before her 17th birthday and she was keen to start building her vinyl collection. “I said to the guys working there, ‘Oh, have you got any jobs going?’” she recalls. “They replied, ‘Yeah, you can give me a blowjob.” Rebekah, who is 5ft 1in, says she would have looked about 14 at the time. “I just used to take it in my stride,” she says. “It took me aback a little bit and I was like, ‘OK, I’m not going to get taken seriously,’ Not getting taken seriously is just a common theme throughout my career.”
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12 Jan 10:03am Night Stalker: retracing the hunt for a killer in a disturbing Netflix series
The Guardian
A new docuseries recounts the hot, terrifying summer of 1985, when one of LA’s most notorious killers preyed indiscriminately on unlocked homes The first minutes of Night Stalker: the Hunt for a Serial Killer, a new Netflix true crime mini-series, focus not on the titular killer, real name Richard Ramirez, but on the city he terrorized in the 1980s: Los Angeles, sun-kissed yet long marked by a grisly streak of noir crime both real (the Black Dahlia, the Manson murders) and fictional (the works of Raymond Chandler, an entire genre of films). From its title font to its darkened and foreboding covers of synth hits, Night Stalker evokes the mid-80s – a time of rapid growth for LA’s national profile, especially following the 1984 Olympics, and, in 1985, a summer of stultifying heat and a wave of fear following a rash of brutal home invasions.
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12 Jan 9:16am New Sally Rooney novel to be published in September
The Guardian
Beautiful World, Where Are You, set to be released on 7 September, follows four young people as they navigate love, friendship and sex Sally Rooney’s third novel, and her first since the widely acclaimed Normal People, will be published on 7 September. Beautiful World, Where Are You, announced by Rooney’s UK publisher Faber on Tuesday, follows Alice and Eileen, two friends in their 20s who find themselves on very different trajectories. Alice, a novelist, meets Felix, who works in a distribution warehouse and asks him to go to Rome with her; Eileen, recovering from a break-up in Dublin, begins to flirt with Simon, a childhood friend.
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12 Jan 9:15am Painted rock snakes preserved as bright mementoes of dark year
The Guardian
Lines of creatively painted stones are being relocated and turned into permanent features across the UK When she first suggested it, she didn’t realise it would get so big. Andree Paterson had been coordinating the hiding and seeking of painted stones for local children via Facebook for a few years now. But when lockdown came to her home town of Kirkcudbright, south-west Scotland, there was a call for something bigger and brighter. And so Rainbow, the Kirkcudbright stone snake, began. Over the weeks it grew around the St Cuthbert’s church wall, and grew longer again, stretching to 255 metres (837ft) of hundreds of painted stones by July. It attracted summer visitors to admire the stones, and rock artists of all ages to add their own contributions.
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12 Jan 9:00am Daniel review – terrifying tale of an Isis captive
The Guardian
The family of a photojournalist held in Syria must raise a multimillion-dollar ransom after the Danish government refuses to negotiate Over the last couple of decades, Danish cinema has increasingly proved to have a strong aptitude for emotive, nuanced drama and intelligent engagement, particularly through documentary-making, with conflicts abroad. This inspired-by-a-true-story feature, from journeyman director Niels Arden Oplev (who helmed the original
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12 Jan 7:00am Hunted review – Red Riding Hood reboot is a nifty, nasty trip into the woods
The Guardian
Vincent Paronnaud takes a well-trodden path with this modern fairytale but adds smart meta-commentary and edgy menace Cinematic rethinks of classic fairytales, especially Red Riding Hood, are a micro-genre about as exasperating and banal as the “year X called and it wants its Y back” joke. In Hunted’s case insert, 1985 for X and “postmodern feminist trope” for Y. Nevertheless, this uncomfortable but adroitly executed horror version in which a young woman is chased through the woods by toxic male monsters is pretty good stuff: unnerving in the right ways and flecked with colourful, unexpected specks of wit.
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12 Jan 6:15am Want to understand the Capitol rioters? Look at the inflamed hate-drunk mobs painted by Goya
The Guardian
The horrific visions of the Spanish painter are about to go on display at New York’s Met. Americans should flock to this timely show – because no artist better captured collective delusion and mass fanaticism The macabre art of Francisco Goya, the first truly modern artist, is due to be exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum in New York next month and there could hardly be a more urgent moment for Americans to look at his images. For, over 200 years ago, this Spanish artist perfectly captured the kind of collective delusion and mass fanaticism that swarmed the US Capitol last week. The mob of Trump supporters who assaulted the home of American democracy were as inflamed as the crowd who march with crazed eyes behind a manic musician in The Pilgrimage to San Isidoro, as dangerous as the hate-drunk crowd in The Second of May 1808, spellbound by their goat-headed charismatic idol. And then there’s The Burial of the Sardine, in which a delirious crowd cavort around a huge banner of a madly grinning face. At first glance, it seems to be a joyous carnival scene, but look closer and the intensity of their rite becomes unsettling as you notice that face on the banner, their vacant lord of the dance. It has a definitive Trumpian air.
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12 Jan 4:00am The last broadcast: as streaming takes over, are TV channels doomed?
The Guardian
The BBC and Channel 4 are refocusing their output to keep up with on-demand services – but don’t bin your TV just yet Nobody wins a prize for predicting that streaming TV will move up a gear in any upcoming year – but television on demand really is about to hit a whole new level in 2021. How much of the telly you watch this year will be on a live, linear channel, at the scheduled hour, with millions of others tuning in at exactly the same time? For many of us, the answer is getting dangerously close to none. The stay-at-home atomisation of culture has been accelerated by the pandemic, which has boosted streaming. And a flurry of recent announcements has shown that, in 2021 and beyond, it will undergo another major expansion. Disney+
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12 Jan 4:00am Updated Young adult books roundup – review
The Guardian
Hate U Give author Angie Thomas follows up her acclaimed debut, and there are tales of racism, mystery and magic in the latest crop of young adult fiction Angie Thomas returns to the world of her award-winning debut
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12 Jan 2:00am American girl behind the camera: the pioneering work of Ruth Orkin – in pictures
The Guardian
A new auction marks 100 years since the birth of US photographer Ruth Orkin, who travelled the world making waves in an industry dominated by men
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12 Jan 1:20am TV tonight: Jessica Williams and Phoebe Robinson in UK debut for podcast spinoff
The Guardian
2 Dope Queens arrive with insightful celebrity conversations, starting with Jon Stewart. Plus: How to Lose Weight Well. Here’s what to watch this evening
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