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Wednesday, March 20, 2019
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20 Mar 1:14pm Bill & Ted 3 confirmed by Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter
The Guardian
Stars of the popular comedy make announcement on Youtube that Bill & Ted Face the Music is going into production this summer The long-mooted third Bill and Ted movie is set to go into production this year with a projected release date of summer 2020, it has been announced. Actors Alex Winter and Keanu Reeves – aka William “Bill” S Preston Esq and Theodore “Ted” Logan – broke the news in a short promotional video filmed at the Hollywood Bowl. Thanking “you the fans”, the pair said the title of the new film would be Bill & Ted Face the Music, and would “hopefully” shoot in the summer.
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20 Mar 12:37pm From Serial to Bryan Singer: why Amy Berg is the documentarian to fear
The Guardian
She has tackled injustice and abuse in the film industry and the Catholic church. The Oscar-nominated director reveals why she is telling the shocking story hit podcast Serial failed to cover The Maryland court of appeals this month
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20 Mar 12:07pm Peterloo exhibition targets new generation of protesters
The Guardian
Show in Manchester displays key objects shedding light on massacre 200 years ago The Scum Uppermost, a satirical cartoon of popular radical reform represented as a many-headed monster, and embroidered flags are among the objects being brought together for the first time in an exhibition marking the 200th anniversary of the
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20 Mar 11:00am Minding the Gap review – skater boys face up to the daily grind
The Guardian
Bing Liu’s poignant documentary follows two men from small-town Illinois as they grapple with life, loss and fatherhood Bing Liu is a 29-year-old Chinese-American film-maker, a former camera assistant on movies by Spike Lee and the Wachowskis whose first feature is a worthwhile documentary study of two guys from his hometown of Rockford, Illinois. They have effectively outgrown their former passion of skateboarding – it’s the director’s passion, too – and now face a difficult adulthood of responsibilities and unprocessed childhood pain. Bing has let his film evolve and grow naturally out of an extended process of interviewing the principals, comparing his own situation with theirs … and then seeing what happens. (Film-makers Erick Stoll and Chase Whiteside did something comparable with their excellent film
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20 Mar 10:40am Booksmart review – wild, warm high school comedy puts girls on top
The Guardian
Olivia Wilde’s directorial debut is a funny, filthy, female-fronted competitor to Superbad that boasts its own distinctive style During the first act of SXSW crowd-pleaser Booksmart there’s a fantastically humbling, game-changer of a moment for Molly (
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20 Mar 9:26am Mums Make Porn: can five normal women do it better than the pros?
The Guardian
Hardcore pornography is just two clicks away for today’s children – so who better to rewrite the rules of sex on screen than their mums?
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20 Mar 9:00am The White Crow review – Ralph Fiennes brings poise to ballet biopic
The Guardian
This retelling of Rudolf Nureyev’s escape to the west survives some flat acting thanks to David Hare’s nuanced script The White Crow is a watchable, serviceable movie telling the story of ballet legend Rudolf Nureyev and his sensational escape to the west in the early 60s at the age of 23, while on his first European tour. Dance is represented as a transcendental experience of success, of leaving behind the past and reinventing the future. Like
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20 Mar 8:45am Tarantino set to premiere Once Upon a Time in Hollywood at Cannes
The Guardian
The director’s new film stars Margot Robbie as Sharon Tate, Leonardo DiCaprio as a former western TV star and Brad Pitt as his stunt double On 21 May it will be 25 years since Pulp Fiction premiered at the Cannes film festival, before winning the Palme d’Or. And reports have emerged that the same date this year is likely to mark the first screening of Tarantino’s latest film, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. The film is one of the near-certainties for this year’s festival, particularly
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20 Mar 8:25am Narnia for ever: the internet age demands a copyright rethink
The Guardian
Writers get welcome protection through copyright and trademark law, but the system is a mess. Francis Spufford’s fan-fiction Narnia novel brings fresh impetus to reform
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20 Mar 8:00am How Was It for You? by Virginia Nicholson review – women, sex and power in the 1960s
The Guardian
Mini skirts, music, the pill … Does a chronicle of women’s lives in the 60s really grasp what the decade meant? I am a child of the 60s. I was born in 1950: all my teenage time, except the final two months, happened in that decade. In fact in the late 60s, while Paris burned, the police in Chicago beat up antiwar protesters, homosexuality was legalised, unmarried women were allowed to take the pill and the commercial exploitation of stretchy tights meant that skirts could get even shorter, my parents were raising five teenagers. It has taken me 50 years to appreciate and be grateful to them for how well they coped with this onslaught of energy. It was tough for them, but it was wonderful for us (and we are still all friends). “Old age forgets” but I cannot – and do not want to – forget, especially as a woman, that heady, wild, often confused but deeply optimistic period of my life when everything seemed possible. So I fell with eagerness on Virginia Nicholson’s book. It is the latest volume in her chronicles of women’s lives in the UK over the last century and it is good fun: a steady march through the decade, taken chronologically rather than thematically, with lots of first-person voices, interesting odd incidents and a strong narrative push towards the establishment of the
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20 Mar 7:53am Rodent leather and designer kidneys: art in the age of bio-revolution
The Guardian
Bespoke breasts, cloned frog meat and a gold gimp suit all feature in a remarkable new exhibition exploring the cutting edge of science John A Douglas has a lot to thank medical science for – not least the new kidney he received in 2014 from an anonymous donor. “Since the operation, I’ve become a gym bunny, and lost 35 kilograms,” says the Australian artist over Skype. “But the main thing is I’d be dead otherwise.” Still, the procedure left him with complicated feelings to process. “I was absolutely devastated after the surgery. At the beginning, you lose your sense of self. I’ve been surgically altered with the DNA and tissue of another person. So in a sense I’m a post-human whose death has been deferred at the cost of lifelong compliance programmes of medication, diet and fitness. My body will be monitored and observed for the rest of my life. In a sense it’s not my body any more – it’s been successfully invaded.”
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20 Mar 7:00am Top 10 toxic families in fiction
The Guardian
From Edward St Aubyn’s damaged addict to Roald Dahl’s ingenious bookworm, Hannah Beckerman picks her favourite tales of families at war Toxic families in fiction go back as far as the art of storytelling itself. Greek mythology is awash with dysfunctional families, from Kronos swallowing his children to ensure they never usurp him to Zeus and the Olympians overthrowing their parents, the Titans. The Old Testament gives us fratricide with Cain and Abel, sibling rivalry with Joseph and his brothers, and the devastating effects of parental favouritism with Jacob and Esau. Fairytales delight in wicked stepmothers, neglectful fathers and evil sisters. For 3,000 years or more, storytellers have known that there is no narrative so powerful as the warring family. It doesn’t take a classicist, theologian or literary critic to understand the draw. We love stories about family because it’s the one thing we all have in common: however different our experiences, we all begin life in some form of family. Dysfunctional families in fiction reassure us that ours is not the only one fraught with tensions, conflicts, rifts and rivalries.
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20 Mar 4:00am Pilot, lawyer, medic: meet the people who turned video game careers into real ones
The Guardian
Games can offer a window on to other jobs as well as other worlds. Three players explain how their favourite games guided working life choices Back in 2016, the current Manchester United boss
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20 Mar 3:00am Lenny Kravitz: ‘I wore a red suede tunic suit – I knew I was taking a risk’
The Guardian
The musician explains how the outfit he wore in the Are You Gonna Go My Way video made him feel powerful and beautiful, and set him apart from every other 90s performer In the video for Are You Gonna Go My Way, I wore a red suede tunic suit: a pair of trousers with a long sleeveless top that reached almost to the floor, with buttons from the collar all the way down. We paired it with big platform boots, and I would wear the whole thing for rehearsals to get used to playing in it. The first time I put it on, it felt amazing. It felt powerful and beautiful and ceremonial, and it was perfect for the video. At the same time, I knew that I was taking a risk. It was very different from what anybody was wearing at that time, in 1993. But people loved it, and when that video came out, it broke down walls. It was the perfect song with the perfect image and it blew up.
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20 Mar 2:32am Disney seals $71bn deal for 21st Century Fox as it prepares to take on Netflix
The Guardian
The acquisition of Rupert Murdoch’s film and TV studio business will boost Disney as it enters the TV streaming market Disney has closed its $71bn (£54bn)
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19 Mar 8:01pm EastSpenders: BBC criticised for £87m cost of new Albert Square
The Guardian
MPs say ‘fundamental mistakes’ led to new set being late and over budget The BBC’s attempt to build a new Albert Square for the filming of EastEnders has been heavily criticised by a group of MPs, who have concluded that the enormous £87m cost of the project ain’t worth it. The project to build an entire new stage set for the flagship soap opera is now running £27m over budget and is not due to be completed until May 2023, nearly five years later than originally planned. The new set is part of a wider programme called “E20” that also includes new production facilities.
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