Back The Guardian Wednesday, November 21, 2018
Search Sections 21 Nov

The Guardian

Wednesday, November 21, 2018
Close
Advertisement
21 Nov 1:34pm France urged to change heritage law and return looted art to Africa
The Guardian
Report commissioned by Macron recommends restitution of artworks taken during colonial era A report commissioned by Emmanuel Macron will call for thousands of works of African art in French museums taken without consent during the colonial period to be returned to the continent.
 Like Reply
21 Nov 11:53am The Knot: a wedding dance like no other – in pictures
The Guardian
In her new touring show, the Dutch choreographer Didy Veldman invites the audience to a wedding. But there’s no shuffling around this dancefloor – the seven dancers are professionals
 Like Reply
21 Nov 10:19am We have liftoff: Edinburgh Observatory embarks on a new mission
The Guardian
The Observatory on Calton Hill was a decrepit ruin until arts group Collective decided to make it their spectacular new gallery, giving new life to a monument to the Scottish Englightenment Edinburgh’s old and elegant skyline has a thrilling new attraction, a hilltop haven for art lovers and astronomers, dog walkers and coffee drinkers. The
 Like Reply
21 Nov 9:36am France urged to return looted African art treasures
The Guardian
Report commissioned by Macron will recommend restitution of artworks taken during colonial era Experts appointed by Emmanuel Macron will advise him this week to allow the return of thousands of African artworks held in French museums, a radical shift in policy that could put pressure on other former colonial powers, including the UK, to follow suit. Calls have been growing in Africa for the restitution of its cultural treasures, but French law strictly forbids the government from ceding state property, even in well-documented cases of pillaging.
 Like Reply
21 Nov 9:30am Ralph Breaks the Internet review – virtually impossible to enjoy tiresome arcade game re-run
The Guardian
The sequel to Wreck-It Ralph is an overstuffed but weirdly pointless exercise in tech worship that fails to include much that actually connects with the audience
 Like Reply
21 Nov 9:08am Readers rejoice as shop finally sells book that sat on shelf for 27 years
The Guardian
Announcement of unusually slow sale of Pitkin children’s biography of William the Conqueror retweeted 150,000 times An independent bookshop in Merseyside has warmed the hearts of hundreds of thousands of readers around the world after revealing the sale of a book that had sat forgotten on its shelves for 27 years. Broadhursts of Southport’s part-time staff member Joanne Ball announced on Twitter that she had just sold a book in stock since May 1991. “We always knew its day would come,” she wrote of the Pitkin children’s biography of William the Conqueror – unaware that her announcement would be retweeted almost 150,000 times as book-lovers worldwide rejoiced in the book finally finding a home.
 Like Reply
21 Nov 8:20am Roald Dahl’s nature journal My Year republished after decades out of print
The Guardian
The author’s final book records his observations of the Buckinghamshire countryside alongside memories of childhood hijinks From the badgers lining their “deep winter quarters” with dry leaves to the larch woods making “great splashes of golden flame”, Roald Dahl’s vision of November is laid out in his last book: a diary of the author’s year that has been republished for the first time in 20 years.
 Like Reply
21 Nov 7:49am In the key of F: Harriet Harman on why musical creativity is not a male preserve
The Guardian
If you go to a concert by Trinity Laban Conservatoire this season, at least half the works you hear will be by female composers. By reclaiming the neglected sounds of the past, it hopes to encourage future women Creativity is a miracle and a blessing that needs to be nurtured and celebrated wherever it springs from. And a diversity of creators only enhances and deepens the creative landscape. So, as chair of
 Like Reply
21 Nov 6:48am Top 10 books about Japan
The Guardian
Taking in folklore, history and the world’s first novel, here is some of the best reading about an endlessly inventive country Japan has a birthday this year. It’s 150 years since rebel samurai overthrew the old Tokugawa Shogunate, marched – or, rather, palanquined – a teenage emperor into the newly named city of “Tokyo”, and made him their figurehead as they set about transforming their country. Western warships had recently been menacing Japanese shores, not so much offering friendship as insisting on it at the point of a gun. If Japan’s new leaders were to avoid becoming next on colonialism’s to-do list, a rapid programme of modernisation was called for: factories and weapons; mines and offices; trains, trams, trade. How do you persuade a population used to thinking in regional rather than national terms, and who have next to no idea who you are, to cooperate in all this? To pay taxes, to join your army, to send their children to new national schools? One way is to tell stories. About Japan as a place especially blessed, perhaps even by the gods. About a country destined one day to become a beacon of modernity in Asia – if only people would put the effort in now.
 Like Reply
21 Nov 6:36am Indian police file rape case against Bollywood actor Alok Nath
The Guardian
Nath investigation comes amid storm of allegations against prominent Indian figures Police have filed a case against a Bollywood actor in what is the thought to be the first rape proceedings to be formally registered among dozens of recent sexual misconduct allegations. The case against Alok Nath, who made his professional debut in Richard Attenborough’s Oscar-winning film Gandhi, is one in a storm of allegations emerging in recent weeks, which activists have hailed as the arrival of the country’s #MeToo moment.
 Like Reply
21 Nov 5:47am Foo Fighters, the 1975 and Post Malone to headline Reading and Leeds 2019
The Guardian
The dual-site festival will feature two first-time headliners when it returns for its 58th edition next August US rock band
 Like Reply
21 Nov 4:00am Souls Grown Deep: the foundation helping to preserve black artists
The Guardian
The Atlanta-based group boasts work by roughly 160 artists of colour and a string of deals with major US museums hints at a vital shift in the art world Through the 1960s and 1970s, Purvis Young, a self-taught artist from Miami, roamed the inner city streets of Overtown, scouring for cardboard, wooden crates and secondhand doors to use as canvas for his expressive paintings. He learned the chops of art history – from Rembrandt to Van Gogh – through library books. He was often called an
 Like Reply
21 Nov 4:00am The Life of Saul Bellow by Zachary Leader review – love, sex, friendship as fiction fodder
The Guardian
The later years, from 1965 to 2005, of an irreverent philanderer, whose rich, phrase-making novels remained thinly veiled versions of his personal life When the
 Like Reply
21 Nov 2:45am Half-Life at 20: why it is the most important shooter ever made
The Guardian
From its opening scenes, Valve’s pioneering sci-fi horror game reinvented storytelling and universe building – what made it such a terrifying success? Most action video games begin with an explosion. Half-Life begins with a commute. A monorail carriage slowly transports everyman scientist Gordon Freeman to his new job at a remote science facility, Black Mesa. In the background, a computerised female voice issues safety information, while through the windows we see tableaux of life at the institution: weird robotic machines, bespectacled scientists, a security guard desperately banging on a sealed door. It was the first hint that this new game from fledgling Seattle-based developer Valve was going to be something interesting and unusual. The brilliance of Half-Life begins with its immersive storytelling. The opening accustoms us to the Black Mesa research facility, tells us a little about Freeman’s role and sets up the narrative universe – all without leaving his perspective. As you enter the facility, fellow scientists chat to Freeman about a forthcoming experiment, voicing concerns and discussing trivial details. You can stand and listen or just wander off. In this way, Half-Life is naturalistic, which was a revelation in 1998. The lack of cinematic cutaway scenes showed great faith in the world and the player, and deepened your relationship with the environment and the protagonist. The message is simple: you’re trapped here too.
 Like Reply
21 Nov 2:00am From climate change to red pills: what are the best TV shows really about?
The Guardian
Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad and Mad Men are series that are riddled with many hidden meanings and theories – why else are we so transfixed by them? Of course, Game of Thrones is about climate change.
 Like Reply
21 Nov 2:00am Doughnuts, drag and an extraterrestial: 48 hours in Blackpool – in pictures
The Guardian
Benita Suchodrev spent two days in the Lancashire seaside resort, pointing her camera at its tourists and townsfolk, at the tattoo parlours, amusement arcades and the iconic Tower
 Like Reply
21 Nov 1:20am Wednesday’s best TV: Trans Kids: It’s Time to Talk; The Apprentice
The Guardian
A psychotherapist questions whether she would have sought gender transition in the 80s. Plus: an art-themed task on The Apprentice Growing up in the 1980s, the psychotherapist, author and married mother-of-two Stella O’Malley was convinced that she should have been born a boy. But would she have sought gender transition – as a growing proportion of kids are now doing (the number of young people referred to the NHS’s gender identity service over the past nine years has risen from 97 in 2009 to 2,519 in the year to April) – if she had had the chance back then? In this film, she talks with children, parents and academics about the issue.
 Like Reply
21 Nov 1:00am Stars behind bars: the jailhouse rockers helping prisoners to bang out a hit
The Guardian
With jams, live gigs and proper recording sessions, Britain’s prisons are rocking – thanks to InHouse Records, the label aiming to help convicts climb up the charts Aaron O’Mara is sitting in a studio with a guitar on his lap and keyboards and drum machines all around him. “Break,” he says, referring to the song he is about to play, “is all about my past, which featured a lot of substance misuse. Now everything is looking up, it feels like I’m finally catching my break.” The 25-year-old, who recently finished a 10-month stretch behind bars, strums his guitar and launches into the heartfelt ballad. It swings between regret, depression and hope. It’s an apt theme for his debut single, which will be released next year. O’Mara, a chef, is one of 15 ex-prisoners and 80 current inmates working with a label called
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Tuesday, December 11, 2018

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept