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The Guardian

Monday, October 22, 2018
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22 Oct 11:33am Lil Peep: how to handle the release of an album shrouded in tragedy
The Guardian
At an intimate listening party, the final album from the rapper who died last year was unveiled with family and friends explaining how they ensured it would honour his legacy “This album is important because Gus is dead,” said Liza Womack, Lil Peep’s mom, when presenting his second album Come Over When You’re Sober Pt 2
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22 Oct 9:00am Do androids dream of electric beats? How AI is changing music for good
The Guardian
Breakthroughs in artificial intelligence make music composition easier than ever – because a machine is doing half the work. Could computers soon go it alone? The first testing sessions for SampleRNN – an artificially intelligent software developed by computer scientist duo CJ Carr and Zach Zukowski, AKA Dadabots – sounded more like a screamo gig than a machine-learning experiment. Carr and Zukowski hoped their program could generate full-length black metal and math rock albums by feeding it small chunks of sound. The first trial consisted of encoding and entering in a few Nirvana a cappellas. “When it produced its first output,” Carr tells me over email, “I was expecting to hear silence or noise because of an error we made, or else some semblance of singing. But no. The first thing it did was scream about Jesus. We looked at each other like, ‘What the fuck?’” But while the platform could convert Cobain’s grizzled pining into bizarre testimonies to the goodness of the Lord, it couldn’t keep a steady rhythm, much less create a coherent song. Artificial intelligence is already used in music by streaming services such as Spotify, which scan what we listen to so they can better recommend what we might enjoy next. But AI is increasingly being asked to compose music itself – and this is the problem confronting many more computer scientists besides Dadabots.
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Simon Mayo and Jo Whiley to leave Radio 2 Drivetime show 22 Oct 6:41am Simon Mayo and Jo Whiley to leave Radio 2 Drivetime show
The Guardian
Mayo to focus on book deal and 5 Live film show as Whiley moves to an evening slot Simon Mayo and Jo Whiley are to leave the BBC Radio 2 Drivetime show, as part of a shake-up at the UK’s most popular radio station. Mayo has had the slot since 2010 but tensions are thought to have arisen after
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Simon Mayo to leave Radio 2 Drivetime show 22 Oct 6:05am Simon Mayo to leave Radio 2 Drivetime show
The Guardian
Presenter, who has had slot since 2010, will leave afternoon show but will continue to work with BBC Simon Mayo is to leave the BBC Radio 2 Drivetime show, as part of an ongoing shake-up at the UK’s most popular radio station. The presenter has had the slot since 2010 but tensions are thought to have arisen after
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Bloody Brilliant Women by Cathy Newman review – the history your teacher forgot to mention 22 Oct 3:00am Bloody Brilliant Women by Cathy Newman review – the history your teacher forgot to mention
The Guardian
A celebration of women who helped shape modern Britain is as entertaining as it is enlightening
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Streaming: where to find the best horror films 22 Oct 3:00am Streaming: where to find the best horror films
The Guardian
It’s that time of year when a cosy evening of horror beckons – and what better place to start than Shudder It’s been a long time since I last checked in on
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Agoraphobia and an unhappy marriage: the real horror behind The Haunting of Hill House 22 Oct 2:00am Agoraphobia and an unhappy marriage: the real horror behind The Haunting of Hill House
The Guardian
Stephen King says The Haunting of Hill House is ‘nearly perfect’. But can a Netflix TV adaptation capture Shirley Jackson’s dark visions of duty and domesticity? Anyone who has read Shirley Jackson’s
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A mountain for Merseyside: why have Las Vegas boulders landed in Liverpool? 22 Oct 1:00am A mountain for Merseyside: why have Las Vegas boulders landed in Liverpool?
The Guardian
These seven stacks of lurid rocks are the latest must-see attraction in Vegas, delighting 16 million visitors. Can their maker work the same magic in Liverpool? A couple of years ago, seven stacks of multicoloured boulders appeared in the Nevada desert. Drivers passing by on Interstate 15 must have wondered what exactly these 10-metre towers were. Teetering piles of gambling chips won by giants in nearby Las Vegas? Cairns erected by shamanic hikers on acid? Proof that neolithic man had pop art colours in his palette? Graffiti quickly offered other interpretations. A spray-painted “666” on one boulder suggested this was work of the devil, while some scrawled genitals associated the boulders with the rites of a fertility cult. And nobody knows what the jokers who wrote “Hella Spiders” on one boulder were on about.
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