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Friday, October 12, 2018
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12 Oct 12:11pm Legless Japanese businessmen: the photographer who caught a Tokyo epidemic
The Guardian
When the train has gone and a hotel is too expensive, pavements and benches are the only option. Paweł Jaszczuk on how he captured new phenomenon A well-to-do man is dressed for success: black lace-ups, tie and a sharp pinstripe suit. So why is he asleep on a Tokyo pavement in the dead of night, curled up like a foetus in the womb?
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Why has the UK stopped producing pop superstars? 12 Oct 10:35am Why has the UK stopped producing pop superstars?
The Guardian
Three years ago British artists made up half the global top 10. Now the biggest new stars barely make a mark overseas. What is behind this sea change – and is there a way back? Has the UK music business lost its magic touch for creating pop superstars? The UK music industry will celebrate the inaugural National Album Day on Saturday, but top-selling new albums by British pop artists are few and far between in 2018. It’s not that there is a dearth of new music in the UK: albums by
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12 Oct 10:28am ‘Up-lit’ gives hope to publishers at Frankfurt book fair
The Guardian
‘Hopeful’ novel about an elderly woman who adopts a dog leads the charge from feelgood fiction A debut novel about a lonely old woman who has fallen through the cracks of society has wowed publishers at this week’s Frankfurt book fair, with 10 presses fighting to win a book that is being compared to the smash hit Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine. The television producer Beth Morrey’s first novel, The Love Story of Missy Carmichael, has emerged as one of the biggest titles among a deluge of fiction following the trend for uplifting literature, or “up-lit”. Selling to HarperCollins for a six-figure sum after a 10-way auction, the novel finds elderly Missy Carmichael living alone with her husband gone, her daughter not speaking to her and her son in Australia – until she adopts a dog.
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Ghosts, ghouls and graveyards: Margaret Atwood on the magic of Neil Gaiman 12 Oct 9:00am Ghosts, ghouls and graveyards: Margaret Atwood on the magic of Neil Gaiman
The Guardian
What’s the point of life without death? The author of The Handmaid’s Tale salutes Gaiman’s shadow side Once, during an on stage discussion of the type literary festivals go in for, I frightened Neil Gaiman by channelling the voice of the Wicked Witch of the West from the film
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12 Oct 8:19am Battersea Arts Centre seeks new artistic director to succeed David Jubb
The Guardian
Jubb, who has spent 15 years in the role, is to leave the arts centre which has fully reopened after its fire three years ago Battersea Arts Centre, the vibrant London venue that recently
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12 Oct 6:06am A teenage tradition: quinceañera celebrations in Cuba – in pictures
The Guardian
The quinceañera, the 15th birthday rite of passage into womanhood, is widely celebrated in Latino culture. The ostentatious display of wealth at these events is important, even in communist Cuba. The photographer
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Brexit is black cloud for UK arts, says former National Theatre boss 12 Oct 5:03am Brexit is black cloud for UK arts, says former National Theatre boss
The Guardian
Sir Nicholas Hytner says council cuts and sidelining of subjects at school add to crisis Sir Nicholas Hytner has delivered alarming warnings about the health of British arts and culture amid Brexit, council spending cuts and the
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Javier Marías: ‘I gave up on Karl Ove Knausgaard after 300 pages’ 12 Oct 5:00am Javier Marías: ‘I gave up on Karl Ove Knausgaard after 300 pages’
The Guardian
The author and translator on the guilty pleasure of rereading Ian Fleming, the power of Tristram Shandy – and his childhood love for Just William
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John Grant: Love Is Magic review – electro-amped tragedy and eyebrow-waggling 12 Oct 4:30am John Grant: Love Is Magic review – electro-amped tragedy and eyebrow-waggling
The Guardian
(Bella Union) A great many people will love John Grant’s fourth solo album, and they will not be wrong to do so. They might well be drawn to the idiosyncrasies, and to the way his increasing use of electronics has led him to an album on which the squelch of analogue synths all but drowns out pianos and acoustic guitars (“
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Hologram of Amy Winehouse set for 2019 worldwide tour 12 Oct 4:18am Hologram of Amy Winehouse set for 2019 worldwide tour
The Guardian
Singer will follow Roy Orbison and Whitney Houston in ‘performing’ posthumously via technology and stagecraft A hologram of
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12 Oct 4:00am Dear Evelyn by Kathy Page review – lives under the microscope
The Guardian
From war to class anxiety to feminism, this story of a long marriage is also a wonderfully evocative sketch of Britain in the 20th century
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From The Hunger Games to Utøya and The Hate U Give: how cinema declared war on the young 12 Oct 4:00am From The Hunger Games to Utøya and The Hate U Give: how cinema declared war on the young
The Guardian
A new wave of films and docudramas offer a raw vision of adult violence against children. What does the on screen bloodletting tell us about how we live now? The facts are public knowledge. On 22 July 2012, wearing a police uniform bought online,
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12 Oct 3:00am Sexy hardback: what will the Justin Timberlake autobiography be like?
The Guardian
With the pop star’s new book, Hindsight & All the Things I Can’t See in Front of Me, on its way, here are some (imagined) extracts
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Life on Earth by David Attenborough review – a reissued classic 12 Oct 2:30am Life on Earth by David Attenborough review – a reissued classic
The Guardian
The classic TV series and book influenced a generation. Its welcome reissue and update reveals how scientific knowledge has moved onSomewhere in my parents’ photo albums there is a picture of me, aged seven or eight, lying in my bed, reading. On the wall, there are postcards from holidays, a poster of space pirate
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From Garth Marenghi to big-screen horror – what the ‘lost boy’ of comedy did next 12 Oct 2:00am From Garth Marenghi to big-screen horror – what the ‘lost boy’ of comedy did next
The Guardian
Matthew Holness won the Perrier award at 26, made a much-loved series for Channel 4 and then … almost nothing. Now, at 43, he has made his first film, Possum, inspired by Jimmy Savile. And, no, it’s not a comedy Matthew Holness has been telling people for years that Possum isn’t a comedy. “It’s not remotely funny,”
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From fridging to nagging husbands: How Killing Eve upturns sexist cliches 12 Oct 1:00am From fridging to nagging husbands: How Killing Eve upturns sexist cliches
The Guardian
The glorious cat-and-mouse thriller subverted decades of spy-thriller tropes. Here are its archetype-slaying moments Picking apart the details of
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