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Monday, June 18, 2018
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18 Jun 3:19pm Will Ferrell to star in Eurovision song contest comedy for Netflix
The Guardian
Actor is writer and star of feature based on the international singing competition Will Ferrell is set to star in a Netflix film based around the Eurovision song contest.
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18 Jun 12:53pm Westworld recap: season 2, episode 9 – will man or machine be the last standing?
The Guardian
In another fine late-season episode, Dolores, the Man in Black and Bernard all face their demons as a final reckoning looms
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Who will succeed Dimbleby as Question Time host? A look at the candidates 18 Jun 12:03pm Who will succeed Dimbleby as Question Time host? A look at the candidates
The Guardian
Kirsty Wark is the bookies’ favourite, but there is a long list of contenders to take over the coveted BBC hosting job For the first time in a quarter of a century,
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18 Jun 10:23am Just chill: the gallery of rebels that took Iceland by storm
The Guardian
Housed in an old herring factory, constantly facing bankruptcy, Reykjavík’s Living Art Museum was once treated with disdain. Now it’s lauded for revitalising the entire country’s art scene In a corner of Reykjavík’s Living Art Museum, a small stone tied in a net hangs precariously from the ceiling. The piece, likely dated from the 1970s, comes from the museum’s collection, although no one seems to know what it is, or who made it. “Maybe someone will recognise it tonight,” speculates the hopeful museum director and artist Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir, as an eccentric flock of locals starts to arrive. They are here for
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One in five at UK festivals sexually assaulted or harassed – survey 18 Jun 8:34am One in five at UK festivals sexually assaulted or harassed – survey
The Guardian
Just 2% of those subjected to unwanted sexual behaviour say they reported it to police One in five festivalgoers – and more than two in five of those who are female and under 40 – say they have been sexually assaulted or harassed at a UK festival, according to a survey. YouGov found that 22% of all festivalgoers, 30% of female festivalgoers of all ages and 43% of those under 40 said they had faced some kind of unwanted sexual behaviour, the most common being “unwelcome and forceful dancing”.
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18 Jun 8:00am When good TV goes bad: Parks and Recreation got sickly sweet
The Guardian
Amy Poehler’s joyful show got a bit too joyful, and had a shark-jumping seventh series retreading old ground and leaving a bad taste in the mouth A sitcom about local government employees in the fictional city of Pawnee, Indiana, Parks and Recreation started with more of a whimper than a bang. It was created by Greg Daniels and Michael Schur, who both worked on the American version of The Office, and in its six-episode first season, the central character, deputy department director Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler) was just another ambitious but barely competent boss. In season two, however, she was rewritten to be confident, capable and optimistic in the face of adversity, from never-ending town meetings to the department’s threatened closure. Her enthusiasm was infectious. She was flanked by a team of eccentrics, from a pre-Jurassic Chris Pratt as Andy, the kind of colleague who Googles your symptoms when you’re ill and tells you it might be “network connectivity problems”, to her boss Ron (Nick Offerman), a back-to-the-land libertarian with a cynical take on everything (“There’s only one thing I hate more than lying: skimmed milk. Which is water that’s lying about being milk”). After the show added Adam Scott and Rob Lowe as auditors Ben and Chris, who arrived to help with the budget crisis, the chemistry really clicked, and seasons two to five were as good as sitcom gets, featuring characters who made us laugh and in whose lives we felt invested.
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18 Jun 6:00am Wild thoughts: what do wilderness films tell us about our sheltered lifestyles?
The Guardian
Films such as Leave No Trace that profess to be about an alternative way of life have more in common with the suburbia of The Truman Show than they seem When I see a movie about people trying to live alternative lifestyles, I think of the travel agency Jim Carrey visits in The Truman Show, with its alarming poster of an airliner getting struck by lightning, accompanied by the slogan: “IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU!” A similar deterrent seems to be in operation whenever people reject conventional ways of living in the movies. More often than not, the parents go crazy, the kids are screwed up and you come out of the cinema thinking: “Well, I’m glad I didn’t try that!” For all its merits, Debra Granik’s latest film Leave No Trace can’t help but agree. It’s the story of a father and teenage daughter who live off-grid in the middle of a national park. Despite their minimal carbon footprint, it is not exactly a sustainable lifestyle: they are evicted by the authorities; dad (Ben Foster) is a traumatised war veteran who can’t cope with “civilisation”; daughter (Thomasin McKenzie) discovers what she’s been missing – like friends.
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Notes from the Cévennes review – an English writer abroad 18 Jun 4:00am Notes from the Cévennes review – an English writer abroad
The Guardian
Adam Thorpe’s erudite memoir reflects on the realities of relocating to a rustic French idyllAdam Thorpe’s memoir begins with a quotation from Daphne du Maurier’s
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18 Jun 3:59am Inside the real Studio 54: Sex balconies! Liza Minnelli! No hats!
The Guardian
Full of rollerskating Wall Street Bankers, tabloid fixtures and postwar frivolity, a new documentary reveals the social backdrop of the famous club
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Crudo: Love in the Apocalypse review – a shimmering experimental novel 18 Jun 2:00am Crudo: Love in the Apocalypse review – a shimmering experimental novel
The Guardian
Donning the persona of the late US author Kathy Acker, Olivia Laing tests the limits of fiction in this extraordinary debutA writer makes things up. In making things up, a greater truth is revealed. This is the premise of much fiction that nostalgically grasps for a certainty that feels as modern as taxidermy. “You couldn’t make it up,” is the hackneyed vernacular. Right now: governance via tweets, poisonings in Salisbury, ice shelves dissolving, the anniversary of a flammable tower block turning into a tomb. Jacob Rees-Mogg being spoken of as a viable prime minister. Nazis in Charlottesville and Hungary. Steve Bannon. Trump meeting the two Kims: Kardashian and Jong-un.
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The Tale: a key film of the #MeToo era deserves more than NowTV 18 Jun 2:00am The Tale: a key film of the #MeToo era deserves more than NowTV
The Guardian
Jennifer Fox’s devastating memoir, pitching her teenage self’s ‘erotic awakening’ against her adult view of sex abuse should be widely availableFrom film festival sensation to streaming channel content: it’s a swift, cinema-skipping trajectory that more and more outstanding films are taking these days, and one I’ve discussed often in this column. But the downshift in screen size for
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Lucy Worsley picks five books that explore hidden domestic lives 18 Jun 1:30am Lucy Worsley picks five books that explore hidden domestic lives
The Guardian
From the evolution of plumbing to the freedoms of well-to-do women, the historian chooses books that shine a light on the nitty-gritty of life in the past “Who emptied the chamber pots?” ask our visitors at
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Monday’s best TV: Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant; Versailles 18 Jun 1:00am Monday’s best TV: Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant; Versailles
The Guardian
A superb biography of the suffragette leader, and Louis XIV upsets the Vatican
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