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Thursday, June 14, 2018
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14 Jun 5:02pm The Trouble With Women With Anne Robinson review – borderline farcical
The Guardian
The Legendary Fleet Street Journalist offered no insight in this unedifying BBC documentary other than her ill-informed opinion The problem with women, if not the world, is that we are not all Anne Robinson. This is the firm opinion of Legendary Fleet Street Journalist Anne Robinson (to give her her full title). We have not all grown up in a domestic matriarchy, inherited our mother’s business savvy and ambition and fought our way in the man’s world of newspaper production from the 60s onwards, demanding pay rises, netting promotions, becoming the first female assistant editor (of the Daily Mirror), ignoring obstacles and sloughing off sexual harassment on our way to journalistic glory and a successful presenting career. As a result, ran the working hypothesis of last night’s documentary The Trouble With Women, presented by Robinson, today’s generation is full of timid, fragile little things who blame men for their every problem and who start online campaigns against harassment instead of just jamming the perpetrators’ balls in the photocopier and going off for a pint with his mates.
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14 Jun 3:00pm Readers recommend: share songs about kings
The Guardian
Nominate in the comments and a reader will pick the best eligible tracks for a playlist next week – you have until Monday 18 June We’ve had a couple of goes at
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14 Jun 12:43pm Plan to sell Hastings pier to entrepreneur angers locals
The Guardian
Group has raised majority of £500,000 target to keep pier in community ownership A seaside pier that has been wrecked twice by fire, served as a landing site for second world war refugees and played host to the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix and Tom Jones is on the verge of being sold to a businessman six years after it was saved with a £12m lottery grant. The proposed sale of Hastings pier prompted a protest this week by local campaigners who have been raising money to try to buy it themselves. They complain that they have not been consulted on the sale and fear for the future of what they call the “people’s pier”.
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14 Jun 12:09pm Jay-Z sued in dispute over royalties from debut album
The Guardian
Raynard Herbert has sued the rapper over an alleged failure to pay him royalties from the sales of his hit album Reasonable Doubt Jay-Z is being sued over royalties for his 1996 album Reasonable Doubt, the debut record that put the now 48-year-old rapper on the map.
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S-Town the movie: is bringing the podcast to the big screen a good idea? 14 Jun 10:23am S-Town the movie: is bringing the podcast to the big screen a good idea?
The Guardian
The story is fragmented, the cast of characters complex – and it exposes the inner life of a very private person to full public scrutiny. What would a big-screen version look like?
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14 Jun 10:15am Ageing bulls: have Robert De Niro’s roles inspired Donald Trump?
The Guardian
They hate each other and are involved in a very public spat. But Trump is a huge fan of De Niro’s movies – and the actor is also a real estate mogul, just like the US president Seconds out for Grudge Match 2: the ageing bull versus the old pretender. It’s a trash-talking, fist-pumping, shadow-boxing spectacular featuring two rich alpha-males who hate each other. Initially, these men appear to be worlds apart. But as they lumberingly circle the ring – trading insults, playing to the gallery – it becomes harder to tell which is which. Here is the story so far. In 2016, Robert De Niro makes a video in which he calls Donald Trump a punk, a pig, a dog and a bozo and
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14 Jun 8:04am David Byrne – every one of his albums ranked!
The Guardian
As the experimental iconoclast embarks on a UK tour for new album American Utopia, we rate all his studio LPs, from Remain in Light to The Last Emperor The most Talking-Heads-esque of
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14 Jun 7:54am Johnny Marr webchat – follow it live!
The Guardian
The former Smiths guitarist, who has also played with everyone from Bryan Ferry to Girls Aloud, is in the office to answer your questions
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14 Jun 7:00am Old Baggage by Lissa Evans review – suffrage and showdowns
The Guardian
In this bittersweet comic novel set in 1928, a veteran of the women’s suffrage movement refuses to give up the fight Mattie Simpkin, former suffragette, is referred to by the disparaging epithet of the book’s title only once, by an insignificant young man (all the males in this novel are peripheral). It’s 1928 and at last the suffrage is to be extended to women over 21. It doesn’t come soon enough for
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14 Jun 7:00am Christina Aguilera: Liberation review – #MeToo makeover hits high and low notes | Alexis Petridis
The Guardian
Aguilera’s eighth album includes some great collaborations with Kanye West, Demi Lovato and Anderson.Paak The most striking track on
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14 Jun 6:00am Tranny Fag review – cheeky melodrama in real-time portrait
The Guardian
This documentary about transgender artist and performer Linn da Quebrada eschews biography for an in-the-moment snapshot The original Portuguese title is Bixa Travesty – the now uncool term “tranny” being an approximation of that second word, maybe something to be reclaimed. (“Bixa” is found on urbandictionary.com for “faggot” or “loser”). This film is a portrait of Linn da Quebrada, a transgender woman from São Paulo who is a rapper, musician, broadcaster and performance artist. Bixa Travesty is a track on her album, in which with cheeky melodrama she depicts herself as: “With just one breast, hair dragging on the floor / And in a bloody hand, a heart.” The film shows her in performance, in the studio, reflecting on the nature of identity, hanging out with friends, and also affectionately chatting with her mum in the apartment where she grew up, arguing about the community’s defeatist habit of romanticising poverty. She aligns the experience of being trans with the marginalisation involved in having no money.
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14 Jun 5:43am My father, the child star: a graphic novelist reflects on the cost of fame
The Guardian
As a gameshow prodigy, Joel Kupperman was fawned over by celebrities and received 10,000 fan letters a week. His son Michael’s illustrated memoir All the Answers explores the true story his father never told him “He was clearly not a performer,” says author and illustrator Michael Kupperman of his father, Joel. “After a certain point, he was not going to become a popular television personality. He didn’t have that kind of ease with the camera. He was very charming as a kid but, as he got older …” He pauses to find the right words. “He’s a very dry fella, you know?” I find it difficult to imagine my own dad as a media sensation, so it is easy to sympathise with Kupperman’s assessment. But as the most prominent member of the much-loved Quiz Kids radio programme, Joel was, for a time, the most famous child in the US.
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14 Jun 5:24am Sylvester Stallone under investigation by police sex crimes team
The Guardian
Actor ‘categorically denies’ allegations of historical sexual misconduct being reviewed by Los Angeles prosecutors Los Angeles prosecutors said on Wednesday that their sex crimes team was reviewing a case against Sylvester Stallone. Greg Risling, spokesman for the Los Angeles District Attorney’s office, did not give any further details but said the case was presented by police in Santa Monica, California.
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Together review – emotive drama about social care for the elderly 14 Jun 4:00am Together review – emotive drama about social care for the elderly
The Guardian
Peter Bowles and Sylvia Syms play an elderly couple who are forcibly separated by officious social workers, after 60 years of marriage One could argue that with this fictional account (based, per the opening titles, “on too many true stories”) of an elderly couple who are forcibly separated from each other by meddling do-gooders is an example of that very thinly populated genre, the sentimental black comedy. Populated by broadly drawn characters whose personalities are subservient to their function to the plot, the whole kit and kaboodle emits a kind of rustic, chortling didacticism, like a cinematic Hogarth series set in the era of NHS bureaucracy and contemporary social work. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, although some viewers might harbour suspicions that, in terms of political sympathies, the film-makers’ intended audience may be less inclined to read the Guardian than the Daily Mail. Philip (perpetual supporting actor
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14 Jun 2:30am A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things review – how capitalism works
The Guardian
Raj Patel and Jason W Moore illustrate a ruinous economic system that benefits a minority class Consider the McNugget. Consider not merely its proprietary combination of succulence and crispness and flavour, but also its usefulness as a symbol of the time in which we find ourselves. Consider its substance, derived from the world’s most common bird, bred to reach maturity within weeks, and with a breast so large it can barely walk.
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Alex Prager’s hyperreal America – in pictures 14 Jun 2:00am Alex Prager’s hyperreal America – in pictures
The Guardian
From a car in a hole to a house ablaze, the American photographer’s bold, bright and frequently unsettling work captures the disquiet of modern life
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14 Jun 1:00am Studio 54 review – wild nights at the club that rocked New York
The Guardian
Matt Tyrnauer’s documentary delivers a lively account of how Studio 54 opened its doors to disco music, hedonism and celebrity revellers Studio 54 is the legendary New York club on Eighth Avenue at 54th Street that opened in the late 70s on the site of a disused CBS TV studio. Co-owners Ian Schrager and Steve Rubell cleverly modified its theatrical space, keeping the balcony and lighting rig and levelling the auditorium with the stage. With wild entrepreneurialism and reckless press-baiting, they captured lightning in a bottle and Studio 54 became world famous for its disco music, its hedonism, its exclusive celebrity guest list, its gay party aesthetic at a time when homophobia was rife on the streets outside. But, after a couple of years, the party was over. Rubell and Schrager were arrested for tax evasion and drugs; they ratted out competitor club-owners to reduce their own jail time; and Rubell was to die of an Aids-related condition in 1989. There was a feature film in 1998 about this called 54, with Mike Myers archly cast as Rubell. Now it is the subject of Matt Tyrnauer’s lively but tactful documentary tribute, centred on sympathetic interviews with the surviving partner, Schrager, now a successful hotelier.
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14 Jun 1:00am Donald Glover: how the star of Atlanta proved that I too could be cool
The Guardian
His raps go viral, his show Atlanta is the hottest thing on TV, and he’s just stolen the new Star Wars film. Where was Donald Glover when I was growing up? When I was a teenager, I sometimes got called an “oreo”. You know, black on the outside, white on the inside. I was as proud as possible of being black and I’d studied black history, but to some of my peers something critical was missing, something ineffable but essential. Some heard it in the voice: not enough bass or grit or soul or something. What they were saying was that I wasn’t black enough. Few said it directly, but some did. Why? I played tennis. I spoke proper English. I unabashedly loved the Beatles. After years in prep school, they thought too much whiteness had seeped into me. This charge, dear reader, was without merit. I was neither white inside (whatever that means) nor did I wish to be white. I played tennis at a black tennis club, I lived for
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