Back Arts Monday, June 18, 2018
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Lily Allen, No Shame album review: Back and better than ever9m Lily Allen, No Shame album review: Back and better than ever
The Independent
Allen never overdramatises the already-dramatic – divorce, children, a stalker, media intrusion – rather she tackles it in an offhand and always bluntly honest manner
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1h 30m John Leslie goes on trial accused of sex assault
BBC
A woman tells a court the former TV presenter put his hand down the back of her trousers.
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2h Just chill: the gallery of rebels that took Iceland by storm
The Guardian
Housed in an old herring factory, constantly facing bankruptcy, Reykjavík’s Living Art Museum was once treated with disdain. Now it’s lauded for revitalising the entire country’s art scene In a corner of Reykjavík’s Living Art Museum, a small stone tied in a net hangs precariously from the ceiling. The piece, likely dated from the 1970s, comes from the museum’s collection, although no one seems to know what it is, or who made it. “Maybe someone will recognise it tonight,” speculates the hopeful museum director and artist Þorgerður Ólafsdóttir, as an eccentric flock of locals starts to arrive. They are here for
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2h Sinitta claims she is victim of six sexual assaults
BBC
"You could tell it wasn't the first time they'd done this," the singer says of her unnamed attackers.
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One in five at UK festivals sexually assaulted or harassed – survey4h One in five at UK festivals sexually assaulted or harassed – survey
The Guardian
Just 2% of those subjected to unwanted sexual behaviour say they reported it to police One in five festivalgoers – and more than two in five of those who are female and under 40 – say they have been sexually assaulted or harassed at a UK festival, according to a survey. YouGov found that 22% of all festivalgoers, 30% of female festivalgoers of all ages and 43% of those under 40 said they had faced some kind of unwanted sexual behaviour, the most common being “unwelcome and forceful dancing”.
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4h When good TV goes bad: Parks and Recreation got sickly sweet
The Guardian
Amy Poehler’s joyful show got a bit too joyful, and had a shark-jumping seventh series retreading old ground and leaving a bad taste in the mouth A sitcom about local government employees in the fictional city of Pawnee, Indiana, Parks and Recreation started with more of a whimper than a bang. It was created by Greg Daniels and Michael Schur, who both worked on the American version of The Office, and in its six-episode first season, the central character, deputy department director Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler) was just another ambitious but barely competent boss. In season two, however, she was rewritten to be confident, capable and optimistic in the face of adversity, from never-ending town meetings to the department’s threatened closure. Her enthusiasm was infectious. She was flanked by a team of eccentrics, from a pre-Jurassic Chris Pratt as Andy, the kind of colleague who Googles your symptoms when you’re ill and tells you it might be “network connectivity problems”, to her boss Ron (Nick Offerman), a back-to-the-land libertarian with a cynical take on everything (“There’s only one thing I hate more than lying: skimmed milk. Which is water that’s lying about being milk”). After the show added Adam Scott and Rob Lowe as auditors Ben and Chris, who arrived to help with the budget crisis, the chemistry really clicked, and seasons two to five were as good as sitcom gets, featuring characters who made us laugh and in whose lives we felt invested.
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Elijah Wood reveals techno-horror VR game at E35h Elijah Wood reveals techno-horror VR game at E3
BBC
Virtual reality game Transference presents the memories of a "traumatised mental patient"."
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5h Dutch PinkPop festival: Man held over hit-and-run death
BBC
Police arrest a suspect after a vehicle hit four people at the end of the Pinkpop music festival
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John Travolta mob film Gotti gets whacked by critics5h John Travolta mob film Gotti gets whacked by critics
BBC
The actor's troubled biopic of crime boss John Gotti gets a rare 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.
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6h Updated David Dimbleby to leave Question Time
BBC
The presenter will leave the political debate show in December after 25 years to return to reporting.
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Selfie mistakes: Sorry, but that is not a celebrity6h Selfie mistakes: Sorry, but that is not a celebrity
BBC
A Labour MP is thrilled to have his photo taken with Clean Bandit but he'd unfortunately posed with the wrong people.
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6h Wild thoughts: what do wilderness films tell us about our sheltered lifestyles?
The Guardian
Films such as Leave No Trace that profess to be about an alternative way of life have more in common with the suburbia of The Truman Show than they seem When I see a movie about people trying to live alternative lifestyles, I think of the travel agency Jim Carrey visits in The Truman Show, with its alarming poster of an airliner getting struck by lightning, accompanied by the slogan: “IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU!” A similar deterrent seems to be in operation whenever people reject conventional ways of living in the movies. More often than not, the parents go crazy, the kids are screwed up and you come out of the cinema thinking: “Well, I’m glad I didn’t try that!” For all its merits, Debra Granik’s latest film Leave No Trace can’t help but agree. It’s the story of a father and teenage daughter who live off-grid in the middle of a national park. Despite their minimal carbon footprint, it is not exactly a sustainable lifestyle: they are evicted by the authorities; dad (Ben Foster) is a traumatised war veteran who can’t cope with “civilisation”; daughter (Thomasin McKenzie) discovers what she’s been missing – like friends.
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Dutch PinkPop festival: One dead in hit-and-run7h Updated Dutch PinkPop festival: One dead in hit-and-run
BBC
Police arrest a suspect after a vehicle hit four people at the end of the Pinkpop music festival
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Notes from the Cévennes review – an English writer abroad8h Notes from the Cévennes review – an English writer abroad
The Guardian
Adam Thorpe’s erudite memoir reflects on the realities of relocating to a rustic French idyllAdam Thorpe’s memoir begins with a quotation from Daphne du Maurier’s
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8h Inside the real Studio 54: Sex balconies! Liza Minnelli! No hats!
The Guardian
Full of rollerskating Wall Street Bankers, tabloid fixtures and postwar frivolity, a new documentary reveals the social backdrop of the famous club
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Crudo: Love in the Apocalypse review – a shimmering experimental novel10h Crudo: Love in the Apocalypse review – a shimmering experimental novel
The Guardian
Donning the persona of the late US author Kathy Acker, Olivia Laing tests the limits of fiction in this extraordinary debutA writer makes things up. In making things up, a greater truth is revealed. This is the premise of much fiction that nostalgically grasps for a certainty that feels as modern as taxidermy. “You couldn’t make it up,” is the hackneyed vernacular. Right now: governance via tweets, poisonings in Salisbury, ice shelves dissolving, the anniversary of a flammable tower block turning into a tomb. Jacob Rees-Mogg being spoken of as a viable prime minister. Nazis in Charlottesville and Hungary. Steve Bannon. Trump meeting the two Kims: Kardashian and Jong-un.
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The Tale: a key film of the #MeToo era deserves more than NowTV10h The Tale: a key film of the #MeToo era deserves more than NowTV
The Guardian
Jennifer Fox’s devastating memoir, pitching her teenage self’s ‘erotic awakening’ against her adult view of sex abuse should be widely availableFrom film festival sensation to streaming channel content: it’s a swift, cinema-skipping trajectory that more and more outstanding films are taking these days, and one I’ve discussed often in this column. But the downshift in screen size for
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Lucy Worsley picks five books that explore hidden domestic lives11h Lucy Worsley picks five books that explore hidden domestic lives
The Guardian
From the evolution of plumbing to the freedoms of well-to-do women, the historian chooses books that shine a light on the nitty-gritty of life in the past “Who emptied the chamber pots?” ask our visitors at
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Monday’s best TV: Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant; Versailles11h Monday’s best TV: Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant; Versailles
The Guardian
A superb biography of the suffragette leader, and Louis XIV upsets the Vatican
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Taking a stand against sexism and racism in the advertising industry17h Taking a stand against sexism and racism in the advertising industry
BBC
Magazine editor Sherry Collins is taking a stand after being confused for a prostitute at a media event.
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19h Question Time: David Dimbleby to step down after 25 years
BBC
David Dimbleby, who has hosted Question Time since 1994, says he will leave it at the end of the year.
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19h Poldark recap: series four, episode two – strong stomachs required
The Guardian
Eye-gouging scenes and grisly medical procedures featured as the series ventured into darker and more dangerous territory Brace e’selves, ’Darkers! For everything is to change! For while Nampara and its surroundings may be bathed in dappled sunlight, a gloomy shadow do loom over Ross and Demelza now that he has sold his soul, become a politician and moved to the ends of the earth (ie London). This was the result of an extraordinary contest modern political parties could only dream of, one where you seemed to require a total of nine votes to become an MP. (Sign me up now for several constituencies!) Ross thinks he is a force for good who will fight for the poor and abolish slavery. We shall see about that. After the exposition and back story of last week’s outing, this was quite the eventful episode, setting things up nicely – and pleasingly precariously – for the rest of the series. The terrifying pirate man who once led Ross on an ill-advised sortie to France set up a wrestling match. Or, as far as Tom “Giant Haystacks” Harry seemed to think, an eye-gouging contest. The main point of this match was (a) to raise funds for the local hospital (thanks, Evil George!), (b) to bring in a love interest for Sam “But I mostly love God” Carne and (c) to provide a rehearsal match with Ross that would lead to a “let me tend to your wounds” bare-chest bathing scene. All worthy aims in life, I think we can agree.
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First Man In: Leading from the Front by Ant Middleton – digested read26h First Man In: Leading from the Front by Ant Middleton – digested read
The Guardian
‘I broke my ankle carrying 200 kilos on a 60-mile hike. So I broke the other one to even up the pain’ You think you know me. You don’t know me at all. The me you see in the SAS TV reality show Who Dares Wins is the me I want you to see. Only I know the real me. That’s what makes me a leader. A winner. Let’s start with The Question. The one everyone wants to ask but daren’t. Because they do not know me. In case you’d forgotten, no one knows me but me. So look me in the eyes and say it. You can’t, can you? Very few people can look in the eyes of a killer. A killer and a leader. That’s me.
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27h The Carters: Everything Is Love review – Beyoncé and Jay-Z celebrate their marriage and magnificence
The Guardian
The duo’s surprise release, rooted far more in hip-hop than R&B, embraces their romantic bliss and phenomenal wealth as well as highlighting racism in the US It may seem an odd thing to say about a record that’s a guaranteed smash hit, but there’s a sense in which Everything Is Love represents a rather dicey undertaking, and not merely because it features Beyoncé rapping more heavily than it features Beyoncé singing. It’s clearly intended as the third part of a trilogy. After
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32h Arundhati Roy: ‘The point of the writer is to be unpopular’
The Guardian
The acclaimed author and activist answers questions from our readers and famous fans on the state of modern India, the threat of AI, and why sometimes only fiction can fully address the world Arundhati Roy does not believe in rushing things.
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33h Awkwafina: ‘I was always the crazy one, the funny one. I’d do anything for a laugh’
The Guardian
When she’s starring alongside Sandra Bullock in Ocean’s 8 or rapping about her vagina on YouTube, she’s Awkwafina. But at home she’ll always be Nora Lum from Queens The front desk clerk at the Beverly Hills Hotel is polite but puzzled. “Nora Lum? No, we have no one staying here of that name.” How about Awkwafina, I ask, spelling it out for him. He looks at me as though he thinks I might be messing with him. “Sorry, madam,” – is that a note of relief in his voice? – “no one of that name either.” I reach for my phone, but then I have an idea. Sandra Bullock? Suddenly I have the attention of all three front desk clerks. “This way, madam.” “Who the fuck is Awkwafina? That’s everyone’s reaction,” laughs Nora Lum/Awkwafina (pronounced Aquafina) when I eventually find her. She and Bullock – or “Sandy” as Lum affectionately calls her – are both holding court at the hotel today to discuss their new movie
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Political podcasts: 10 of the best33h Political podcasts: 10 of the best
The Guardian
In an age of dizzying headlines at home and abroad, political podcasts help an increasing number of listeners keep abreast of a fast-moving and often overwhelming news cycleSerious times call for serious listening. That’s one explanation, at least, for the current explosion in political podcasting. Brexit, the rise of the spectacularly unpredictable Donald Trump, the spread of far-right and far-left populism – all feed a hunger to understand what’s going on and a feeling that it isn’t safe to fall too far behind the news. Something similar happened in the immediate aftermath of the credit crunch, when the realisation that something life-changing had evidently been going on beneath our noses prompted a thirst for anything – books, public lectures, documentaries – that helped readers get to grips with a bewildering world of sub-prime lending and quantitative easing. Now it’s knowing your hard border from your
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Ocean’s 8 review – all-girl gang doesn’t quite deliver the goods33h Ocean’s 8 review – all-girl gang doesn’t quite deliver the goods
The Guardian
Serious star power and slick direction can’t make up for an ensemble cast’s failure to gel This all-girl riff on Steven Soderbergh’s deliciously slick Oceans trilogy is a fun-enough spin-off that centres around a revenge heist orchestrated by Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock), sister of George Clooney’s Danny. Her team comprises Ocean’s partner (Cate Blanchett, who has very little to say or do here), a has-been, tax-evading fashion designer (Helena Bonham Carter, playfully described as “big in the 90s – big Edwardian collars”), a diamond expert (Mindy Kaling), stoner-hacker “Nine Ball” (a drily hilarious Rihanna), a pickpocketing, motormouthed teenager (comedian Awkwafina) and Sarah Paulson’s bored stay-at-home mum as the “fence” or go-between. Their plan is to steal a Cartier necklace from the unsuspecting neck of Bambi-eyed actress Daphne Kluger (Anne Hathaway) at the Met Gala and pin the blame on Debbie’s art dealer ex-boyfriend. Some things work well, such as Hathaway, whose finely tuned facial expressions are the best thing about the film by a country mile; elastic smile and saucer eyes one minute, features furrowed like a wily cat’s the next. Ditto for Blanchett’s jackets, which range from buttery motorcycle leathers and green velvet to leopard-print fur, silk bombers and immaculately tailored pantsuits in sky blue and Willy Wonka plum.
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Hereditary review – shock horror? Only up to a point...33h Hereditary review – shock horror? Only up to a point...
The Guardian
Genuine scares give way to generic cliche in Ari Aster’s much garlanded debut featureBreathless comparisons to
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35h The festival makeover: swords, gong baths and gigs in a volcano
The Guardian
New experiences, great food and yoga have become a big draw as audiences demand more for their moneyFestivals have moved on from music, mud and a murky pint of cider. This year they are just as likely to involve qoya dancing, racing hovercraft, learning medieval swordplay or dancing in a lava tunnel. Promoters are turning to activities to lure people to their festivals, as audiences demand new experiences and great food and show less interest in musicians, DJs or even whether there is a stage.
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Spencer Tunick: Woolworths relents and allows mass nude photo on car park 16 Jun 10:44pm Spencer Tunick: Woolworths relents and allows mass nude photo on car park
The Guardian
Woolworths says Tunick will be given access to car park for one hour on 9 July
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16 Jun 7:16pm Spencer Tunick: Melbourne Woolworths to allow nude photo shoot
BBC
Woolworths says US artist Spencer Tunick can use its rooftop car park, reversing an earlier decision.
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As the Royal College of Art fashion department turns 70, students look to the future 16 Jun 7:07pm As the Royal College of Art fashion department turns 70, students look to the future
BBC
Crystals made from sweat and skirts dipped in cacao, just two of the designs debuting at the Royal College of Art's end of year show.
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