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5h Kanye West – Donda release: New album reportedly delayed by two more weeks
The Independent
Artist’s label said he would be releasing his much-delayed 10th studio album this week
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7h Updated Prince Harry denies he will publish second memoir after Queen’s death
The Independent
Duke of Sussex announced earlier this week that his first memoir will be published in late 2022
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7h Updated Kanye West – Donda release live: New album reportedly delayed by two more weeks
The Independent
Artist’s label said he would be releasing his much-delayed 10th studio album this week
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9h Updated Kaz Kamwi: Meet the Love Island 2021 contestant
The Independent
Fashion blogger is one of this year’s islanders hoping to find romance
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9h Updated Michael B Jordan developing limited series based on Black Superman Val-Zod, says report
The Independent
Report suggests ‘Black Panther’ actor could also star in the as-yet-unconfirmed project
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10h Updated John Barrowman sparks backlash after tagging M Night Shyamalan in criticism about his new film Old
The Independent
Former ‘Doctor Who’ star repeatedly referred to the newly released horror film as ‘s****’
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11h Dave review, We’re All Alone in This Together: Rapper’s second album is full of spine-tingling frankness
The Independent
The Mercury Prize-winning artist brings more voices into his remarkable second album, delivering home truths and personal insights
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12h Updated Love Island 2021: When does Casa Amor start?
The Independent
Fans are already looking forward to the show’s most anticipated event
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12h Why the Marble Arch Mound is a slippery slope to nowhere
The Guardian
The artificial hill in central London seems a great idea, but it would be better to have done something that genuinely helped the environment The Torre Guinigi in Lucca, Italy, is a brick medieval tower – it’s handsome, but of a type common enough in historic Tuscan cities. What makes it special is a grove of holm oaks growing from its summit. Trees come with expectations, such that they are rooted in the ground, yet there they are, high in the air, apparently flourishing. The tower would be less interesting if it weren’t for the trees and the trees would be less interesting if it weren’t for the tower. So there’s something compelling about trees in unexpected places. Hence at least part of the appeal of the High Line in New York, where gardens grow on an old elevated railway line, and of the ski slope on top of the Amager Bakke power plant in Copenhagen. There’s been a thing for
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12h Riders of Justice review – oddly life-affirming revenge comedy
The Guardian
Mads Mikkelsen is the enthusiastically violent avenger, with top back-up support, in Anders Thomas Jensen’s darkly funny new movie A former military man is driven to avenge the death of his wife with brutal, at times overly enthusiastic efficiency. It’s a fairly generic revenge movie premise. However, in the hands of Danish director and co-writer Anders Thomas Jensen (the man behind transgressive black comedy
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13h Suzi Quatro: ‘I’ll never be too old to wear a jumpsuit’
The Guardian
The singer, 71, on enjoying her grandchildren, missing her mum, giving everything on stage and her need for an Ego Room
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14h Jonathan Coe on The Rotters’ Club: ‘My diary provided endless material, but I didn’t like the person I was’
The Guardian
The author on mixing semi-fact with fiction – and the school rule about swimming naked that inspired the novel’s big comedy set piece From 1972-79, I was a pupil at King Edward’s school, Birmingham. It was at that time a direct grant school, which meant that although most of the places (including mine) were not fee-paying, it had all the trappings of a public school. It was single-sex, the teachers wore academic gowns, the assembly hall was called “Big School”, we played rugby rather than football, and there were two school songs, one of them in Latin. It was an elitist school, and many of my more clued-up, politically aware friends were aware of this. I wasn’t. My head was in the clouds and all I was interested in was books, music, film and TV. At the age of 15 I started writing novels and the second one, called
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15h Classical home listening: a fab piano four hands, Louise Farrenc and the Proms
The Guardian
Kirill Gerstein and Ferenc Rados play Mozart; the French composer’s symphonies are a revelation; and it’s back to the Royal Albert Hall… Playing piano four hands – two people, one piano – is among the more intimate forms of music-making. Daniel Barenboim never passes up a chance to play duets
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16h 35 great movies that bombed at the box office
The Independent
It's hard to believe these didn't get the attention they deserved
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16h Reclaiming Amy, review: Documentary is a harrowing account of a family’s grief
The Independent
The new documentary is told through the eyes of Amy Winehouse’s mother, Janice
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17h Fantastic Beasts star Katherine Waterston says trans rights message felt ‘important to communicate’ after JK Rowling controversy
The Independent
‘One wondered if they might be grouped in with other people’s views by association,’ said the actor
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18h Through the Looking Glasses by Travis Elborough review – the spectacular life of spectacles
The Guardian
From Henry VIII on his charger to the sex symbol Michael Caine, this close-up history of glasses illuminates their special kind of cool It turns out that all those stereotypes about people who wear glasses being clever, clumsy and a bit standoffish have their basis in something solid. During the dark ages, when everyone was blundering around with uncorrected vision, the myopes were rotten at finding their place in the world. Literally, they set off on the wrong path, never noticed when a wolf was waiting to pounce and were apt to lunge their sword at the wrong person. This put them at a distinct disadvantage. Not being able to lead the boar hunt, or failing to bow to a nobleman from the other side of the great hall, marked you out as an oik. The safest place was in the library where you could spend your days effortlessly scanning pages of monkish swirl and even having a go at adding some of your own. From then on, swottery and short-sightedness were soldered together in the cultural imagination. Even once myopes started acquiring glasses during the late medieval period, many of these functional deficits remained. As soon becomes apparent in Travis Elborough’s brilliantly enjoyable survey on eyewear, short-sighted people didn’t suddenly acquire glasses and start morphing into party people and hawk-eyed hunters. Early glasses were beta-ish in the extreme, nothing more than a couple of bottle-thick lenses haphazardly tacked together with leather string or, if you were feeling fancy, gold wire. No one had yet noticed how useful ears could be and so, instead of having side arms, lenses were more likely to be attached to a band around the head or stuck on a stick and held up as a lorgnette. The first made you look like a doctor from a Leo Cullum New Yorker cartoon, the second like an effete French aristo about to have their head chopped off.
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18h Polygamy in Senegal, lesbian hookups in Cairo: inside the sex lives of African women
The Guardian
Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah’s new book The Sex Lives of African Women examines self-discovery, freedom and healing. She talks about everything she has learned
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19h Updated The Rock leaves a hard place: Was Diesel’s world just too Fast & Furious?
The Independent
As Dwayne Johnson bids farewell to the full-throttle franchise, Kevin E G Perry asks: When did the muscle-bound one run out of road?
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19h Idris Elba: ‘I used work to exorcise my demons’
The Guardian
The actor was working as a bouncer when he got a small part in a new show called The Wire. Two decades on, he’s a blockbuster fixture. The Suicide Squad star talks about fighting for his big break, losing his dad, and why acting helped him out of a ‘dark, weird junction’
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19h Streaming: Pedro Almodóvar’s The Human Voice and other A-list shorts
The Guardian
The Spanish auteur’s joyous half-hour film The Human Voice, now on Mubi, makes you wish that more top directors would occasionally keep it brief Just as the
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19h Kanye West – Donda release live: Fans left waiting for new album
The Independent
Artist’s label said he would be releasing his much-delayed 10th studio album this week
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19h Blow Out at 40: Brian De Palma’s ingenious thriller remains his greatest
The Guardian
The auteur’s dazzling 1981 masterpiece sees a never-better John Travolta find himself caught in a dangerous murder plot Brian De Palma’s best movie, Blow Out, opens with scene from a movie-within-a-movie, a Z-grade slasher rip-off called Co-ed Frenzy, from the director of such esteemed films as Blood Bath and Blood Bath 2, Bad Day at Blood Beach and Bordello of Blood. The camerawork mimics the killer POV shots of Black Christmas and Halloween, peeping through the windows of a sex-crazed sorority house before ducking inside, where the action alternates between T&A and stabbings. It finally ends with the umpteenth crude variation on the shower scene in Psycho, and the punchline that takes us out of the movie: the actor has a terrible scream.
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20h Malcolm Lee: ‘I think LeBron likes to be coached’
The Independent
The new ‘Space Jam’ movie has big, much-loved shoes to fill. Sopan Deb spoke to the director Malcolm Lee about basketball and working with LeBron James
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20h Katherine Waterston: ‘It’s still pretty much a nightmare to be a woman’
The Independent
The ‘Fantastic Beasts’ star took a while to become one of Hollywood’s most in-demand actors. She speaks to Alexandra Pollard about early setbacks, her nerves filming period romance ‘The World to Come’, and why she didn’t want to be ‘grouped in by association’ with JK Rowling’s views on trans women
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21h TV tonight: Meghan Markle at mid-life
The Guardian
A new documentary takes the occasion of the Duchess’ 40th birthday to delve into her past. Plus: Michael McIntyre’s The Wheel begins. Here’s what to watch this evening
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26h Latitude festival: Magical, emotional... and a little bit frightening
BBC
Bands and fans describe the atmosphere at the UK's first full-capacity festival in the UK since 2019.
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26h Kanye West – Donda release: Fans left waiting for new Kanye West album
The Independent
Artist’s label said he would be releasing his much-delayed 10th studio album this week
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27h Danish Siddiqui captured the people behind the story
The Independent
Pulitzer prize-winning photographer always kept an eye out for the ‘common man’
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